Discussion:
Wi-Fi bandwidth
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pinnerite
2021-04-02 19:39:14 UTC
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I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.

So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.

is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?

I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.

TIA

Alan
--
Mint 20.04, kernel 5.4.0-42-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
William Unruh
2021-04-02 21:40:54 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
The bandwidth is probably more determined by that last 20 feet than
anything else, and that is NOT determinable by any generic statements.
Ie, the wireless part between your computer the modem. It will depend on
environmental noise (is your microwave running) by intevening walls (eg
steel studs), the positioning of the antennae, etc.

Try using some of those speed tests you can find on the web.
Post by pinnerite
TIA
Alan
Bud Frede
2021-04-04 10:06:21 UTC
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Post by William Unruh
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
The bandwidth is probably more determined by that last 20 feet than
anything else, and that is NOT determinable by any generic statements.
Ie, the wireless part between your computer the modem. It will depend on
environmental noise (is your microwave running) by intevening walls (eg
steel studs), the positioning of the antennae, etc.
The key thing is usually airtime. It _is_ possible to measure what's
actually going on, but AFAIK it requires more sophisticated test
equipment than most people have access to.
gcubebuddy
2021-04-20 03:06:32 UTC
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WU> Ie, the wireless part between your computer the modem. It will depend on
WU> environmental noise (is your microwave running) by intevening walls (eg
WU> steel studs), the positioning of the antennae, etc.

Most people dont believe this but when i worked at Dell for consumer laptop /
desktop, they told us that one of the things that can kill a wifi zone is
pine trees planted around a house. apparently the water in the pine needles
vibrate at 2.6 ghtz or something like that which creates "Cross Wave
Cancellation.
- Luke

Thanks
- Gamecube Buddy

telnet --<{bbs.hive32.com:23333}>--
Paul
2021-04-02 23:45:37 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
These are the instructions for Windows. I believe "ttcp"
started on another platform, check your package manager
and see if it is there. I include this, just so I won't
have to re-write it.

https://web.archive.org/web/20130606180737if_/http://www.pcausa.com/Utilities/pcattcp/PCATTCP-0114.zip

On the second (perfectly working) machine, set up the receiver first.

ipconfig # This gives the address of this machine (192.168.1.3)

pcattcp -r -4 # The receiver sits and waits for the transmitter

On the broken machine, do

pcattcp -t -4 192.168.1.3 # Substitute IP address from ipconfig result...

*******

It's almost as basic as Ping, but not quite.

And here is the Linux version.

https://linux.die.net/man/1/ttcp

It's a very basic test.

You could also set up an ftp server on one machine,
and an ftp client on another machine, and do some
testing that way. Some platforms allow setting up
an FTP server with one click - that was MacOSX :-)
Usually, it's more work to set up ftp or http servers
for LAN usage in testing.

There's more than one program out there to test with,
but there is also the tendency to go overboard with
this stuff, and some of the others might be more trouble
than they're worth.

Paul
Bit Twister
2021-04-03 03:03:51 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
Do not know about wi-fi bandwith but you might look into iperf3 for throughput testing.

You start it as a server on one node, then run it on the client node.

For example I have three nodes wb, tb, and mtv. wb is the server and the command
I would run from the client nodes. Following is from my brain book.


$ uh network speed
_network_debug_speed_testing_server_wb_ iperf3 -s
_network_debug_speed_testing_client_mtv_ iperf3 -c wb
_network_debug_speed_testing_client_tb_ iperf3 -c wb

------key words for uh search -------- ---- command to execute--------
Henry Crun
2021-04-03 04:46:31 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
For basic info try installing wavemon (runs on Ubuntu)
--
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Home: http://alpha.mike-r.com/
QOTD: http://alpha.mike-r.com/qotd.php
No Micro$oft products were used in the URLs above, or in preparing this message.
Recommended reading: http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#before
and: http://alpha.mike-r.com/jargon/T/top-post.html
Missile address: N31.7624/E34.9691
pinnerite
2021-04-03 11:01:50 UTC
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On Sat, 3 Apr 2021 07:46:31 +0300
Post by Henry Crun
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
For basic info try installing wavemon (runs on Ubuntu)
I installed wavemon on the mythtv server machine via ssh.
I am not sure whether what it reports is about the internal wi-fi stuff or the quality of its connection via the router to the outside world.

For now, I will stick with viewing live TV in SD.

Thank you for your advice.

Alan
--
Mint 20.04, kernel 5.4.0-42-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
Bit Twister
2021-04-03 11:51:43 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
On Sat, 3 Apr 2021 07:46:31 +0300
Post by Henry Crun
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
For basic info try installing wavemon (runs on Ubuntu)
I installed wavemon on the mythtv server machine via ssh.
I am not sure whether what it reports is about the internal wi-fi stuff or the quality of its connection via the router to the outside world.
Personally, I would suggest you would want to compare results on both
server and client machines.

Do run ifconfig wi-fi_here and check the Tx/Rx lines for problems on
the client machines.
Chris Elvidge
2021-04-03 12:09:59 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Are you using 2.4GHz or 5GHz?
5GHz will give a better data rate.
HD needs more data then SD.
--
Chris Elvidge
England
Jonathan N. Little
2021-04-03 13:11:13 UTC
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Post by Chris Elvidge
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV
over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the
MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi
bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Are you using 2.4GHz or 5GHz?
5GHz will give a better data rate.
HD needs more data then SD.
Additionally, what it distance between server and tv? What is between
server and tv? What channel are you using and proximity to other
networks on the same channel? 5GHz will have higher through put than
2.4GHz but at the expense of range and sensitivity to interference. All
the advantages of the wire over wireless.
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
TJ
2021-04-03 14:34:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Chris Elvidge
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV
over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the
MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi
bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Are you using 2.4GHz or 5GHz?
5GHz will give a better data rate.
HD needs more data then SD.
Additionally, what it distance between server and tv? What is between
server and tv? What channel are you using and proximity to other
networks on the same channel? 5GHz will have higher through put than
2.4GHz but at the expense of range and sensitivity to interference. All
the advantages of the wire over wireless.
Agreed. When I got my first dual-band router, I thought I'd use the 5GHz
band on my laptop, leaving the lower frequency to my brother so we
didn't have to share the bandwidth on the lower frequency. But, I soon
learned that when I put a couple of walls and a floor between my router
and laptop, 5Ghz was actually the slower of the two.

TJ
Jonathan N. Little
2021-04-03 15:26:27 UTC
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<snip>
Post by TJ
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Additionally, what it distance between server and tv? What is between
server and tv? What channel are you using and proximity to other
networks on the same channel? 5GHz will have higher through put than
2.4GHz but at the expense of range and sensitivity to interference. All
the advantages of the wire over wireless.
Agreed. When I got my first dual-band router, I thought I'd use the 5GHz
band on my laptop, leaving the lower frequency to my brother so we
didn't have to share the bandwidth on the lower frequency. But, I soon
learned that when I put a couple of walls and a floor between my router
and laptop, 5Ghz was actually the slower of the two.
Absolutely, you may have a higher initial base bandwidth value but with
a weak and obstructed signal lose all advantage as dropped packets
require resending.
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Melzzzzz
2021-04-03 14:47:36 UTC
Reply
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["Followup-To:" header set to alt.os.linux.mint.]
Post by Chris Elvidge
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Are you using 2.4GHz or 5GHz?
5GHz will give a better data rate.
Yes, but weaker signal.
Post by Chris Elvidge
HD needs more data then SD.
--
current job title: senior software engineer
skills: x86 aasembler,c++,c,rust,go,nim,haskell...

press any key to continue or any other to quit...
Bud Frede
2021-04-04 10:10:17 UTC
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Post by Chris Elvidge
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Are you using 2.4GHz or 5GHz?
5GHz will give a better data rate.
HD needs more data then SD.
HD should still be quite possible with 2.4GHz channels. It also
penetrates better, so in some cases will perform better over a distance.

All of this also depends upon where you live and whether or not there
are competing WiFi networks within range (and how busy those networks
are).
Abandoned_Trolley
2021-04-03 15:01:28 UTC
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Permalink
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Why not stop worrying about "bandwidth" (whatever that means to you) and
check the actual connection speed, just like any normal phone or laptop
user would ?

Theres no mention of it anywhere in this thread

AT
Bud Frede
2021-04-04 10:19:33 UTC
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Post by Abandoned_Trolley
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Why not stop worrying about "bandwidth" (whatever that means to you)
and check the actual connection speed, just like any normal phone or
laptop user would ?
Theres no mention of it anywhere in this thread
It can vary from moment to moment, and may not mean much anyway. It's
like the "bars" that you see on a typical cell phone that are supposed
to indicate signal strength in a meaningful way. :-)

I've been told about some consumer network equipment that recognizes
when one of the popular speed test sites is being used and prioritizes
that traffic so that speed test results look better. (Doing a "VW," in
other words.)

I know of some other consumer network equipment that learns traffic
patterns and changes its behavior based on them. A streaming 4K video
session will be optimized because it takes place over a long period of
time. A speed test is too short in duration to be optimized for (unless
you're cheating like the other company), and it's highly abnormal usage
as well, so the results shown may not reflect real-world usage of the
network.
Abandoned_Trolley
2021-04-04 10:51:50 UTC
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Post by Bud Frede
Post by Abandoned_Trolley
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Why not stop worrying about "bandwidth" (whatever that means to you)
and check the actual connection speed, just like any normal phone or
laptop user would ?
Theres no mention of it anywhere in this thread
It can vary from moment to moment, and may not mean much anyway. It's
like the "bars" that you see on a typical cell phone that are supposed
to indicate signal strength in a meaningful way. :-)
I've been told about some consumer network equipment that recognizes
when one of the popular speed test sites is being used and prioritizes
that traffic so that speed test results look better. (Doing a "VW," in
other words.)
I know of some other consumer network equipment that learns traffic
patterns and changes its behavior based on them. A streaming 4K video
session will be optimized because it takes place over a long period of
time. A speed test is too short in duration to be optimized for (unless
you're cheating like the other company), and it's highly abnormal usage
as well, so the results shown may not reflect real-world usage of the
network.
I am well aware of all of that. However, there is still no mention at
all of the connection speed anywhere in this thread.

More importantly, theres no mention of any attempt to ascertain the
actual (wired or fibre) download speed from the ISP to the router (which
DOES NOT vary from moment to moment) which is more likely to be the
cause of the problem.

I would check the admin page of the router and see what the downstream
line rate is and work from there. If it looks like its OK then (if
possible) it might be an idea to make a temporary WIRED connection to
the router and see if that cures the problem. If it doesnt, then clearly
its not a wi-fi issue.

Nothing I have seen in this thread so far conclusively proves that the
wi-fi is at fault.

AT
Paul
2021-04-04 12:02:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Abandoned_Trolley
Post by Bud Frede
Post by Abandoned_Trolley
Post by pinnerite
I have been experiencing jerkyness streaming live HD TV from MythTV
over wi-fi to my work computer. SD is fine and both are fine on the
MythTV server.
So, I concluded that it must be limits across the wi-fi.
is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi
bandwith and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?
I couldn't find anything from a brief search via DuckDuckGo or google.
TIA
Alan
Why not stop worrying about "bandwidth" (whatever that means to you)
and check the actual connection speed, just like any normal phone or
laptop user would ?
Theres no mention of it anywhere in this thread
It can vary from moment to moment, and may not mean much anyway. It's
like the "bars" that you see on a typical cell phone that are supposed
to indicate signal strength in a meaningful way. :-)
I've been told about some consumer network equipment that recognizes
when one of the popular speed test sites is being used and prioritizes
that traffic so that speed test results look better. (Doing a "VW," in
other words.)
I know of some other consumer network equipment that learns traffic
patterns and changes its behavior based on them. A streaming 4K video
session will be optimized because it takes place over a long period of
time. A speed test is too short in duration to be optimized for (unless
you're cheating like the other company), and it's highly abnormal usage
as well, so the results shown may not reflect real-world usage of the
network.
I am well aware of all of that. However, there is still no mention at
all of the connection speed anywhere in this thread.
More importantly, theres no mention of any attempt to ascertain the
actual (wired or fibre) download speed from the ISP to the router (which
DOES NOT vary from moment to moment) which is more likely to be the
cause of the problem.
I would check the admin page of the router and see what the downstream
line rate is and work from there. If it looks like its OK then (if
possible) it might be an idea to make a temporary WIRED connection to
the router and see if that cures the problem. If it doesnt, then clearly
its not a wi-fi issue.
Nothing I have seen in this thread so far conclusively proves that the
wi-fi is at fault.
AT
Pinnerite setup, described in OP

Some-Wifi-Router ---+---------------------+
| |
Client MythTV -- OTA
(Wifi) (Wifi)
PC PC

This is a question of LAN performance, nothing
about WAN or pulling Netflix or anything like that.

MythTV is capable of complicated setups, but we're not
being told about that. There can be front ends and
back ends in the picture. Tuners doing capture,
would burn up as much bandwidth as client sessions
(2 megabytes/sec per tuner?). A capture tuner could be
competing for bandwidth, with a client session trying
to watch a recording.

Loading Image...

You could do an air survey or whatever. See whether
there's a better Wifi channel or band choice maybe.

https://www.pcwdld.com/wifi-tools

Or any sort of simple LAN transfer would indicate
whether something is broken. If you can only get
11 megabits/sec during a file transfer, that's going
to doom TV streaming.

Doing speedtest.net won't help, because it's not
a WAN issue.

If a router is not supporting QOS (quality of service)
protocol options, then the router might be using nothing
more complicated than round robin. That's what the LAN
to WAN router on my network does. The higher speed portion
is done with a GbE switch. If one machine opens too many
WAN-directed connections to the router, the other machines
might not get as many slices of the WAN pie as a result.
I can just about starve a second machine (can't web surf),
if the first machine opens a shitload of connections. But
this is an issue of getting fair share on the WAN end,
which is not particularly the problem here.

Networking questions can benefit from drawings,
but what are ya gonna do.

Paul
pinnerite
2021-04-06 16:59:48 UTC
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Permalink
On Sat, 3 Apr 2021 16:01:28 +0100
Post by Abandoned_Trolley
Why not stop worrying about "bandwidth" (whatever that means to you) and
check the actual connection speed, just like any normal phone or laptop
user would ?
Theres no mention of it anywhere in this thread
AT
If I disconnect the phone connection at the router, I still have wi-fi access between my devices.

Recording TV does not depend on the wi-fi. the signal comes from the TV aerial directly to both the TV and the HTPC.

Both my work computer and the TV only handle 2.4Ghz. The remaining items are enabled for that and 5Ghz including a TP-Link wi-fi extender.

Now there is no problem on the combined frontend / backend server presumably because wi-fi is not involved. Similarly, playback to the TV is fine because it is connected by an HDMI cable. Sadly to the remote frontend on my work-machine it is.

The extraordinary thing is that playback of HD via wi-fi to my work machine is fine,
Live TV is not. Logically I would expect them behave the same.

As Ian Lang often says "I blame the EU".
--
Mint 20.04, kernel 5.4.0-42-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
Paul
2021-04-07 03:13:04 UTC
Reply
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Post by pinnerite
On Sat, 3 Apr 2021 16:01:28 +0100
Post by Abandoned_Trolley
Why not stop worrying about "bandwidth" (whatever that means to you) and
check the actual connection speed, just like any normal phone or laptop
user would ?
Theres no mention of it anywhere in this thread
AT
If I disconnect the phone connection at the router, I still have wi-fi access between my devices.
Recording TV does not depend on the wi-fi. the signal comes from the TV aerial directly to both the TV and the HTPC.
Both my work computer and the TV only handle 2.4Ghz. The remaining items are enabled for that and 5Ghz including a TP-Link wi-fi extender.
Now there is no problem on the combined frontend / backend server presumably because wi-fi is not involved. Similarly, playback to the TV is fine because it is connected by an HDMI cable. Sadly to the remote frontend on my work-machine it is.
The extraordinary thing is that playback of HD via wi-fi to my work machine is fine,
Live TV is not. Logically I would expect them behave the same.
As Ian Lang often says "I blame the EU".
But you know your MythTV better than anyone here.

The software (not MythTV) for my tuner card, does it this way.

"Live TV"

1) Comes into tuner from OTA antenna.
2) Tuner packets are written to disk. Disk could be on a backend machine.
3) Streaming software reads from disk (delayed maybe a second or two).
4) MPEG2 video now needs to be decoded and sent to a screen, from (3)
This uses a bit of CPU (in the old days), or it uses
the Video SIP on your video card.

The "feature" that comes with this, is while you are watching LiveTV,
you can "commit" what has just been shown, and the file stored on
the hard drive is then kept for later.

The activity in that sequence, might involve two passes on
Wifi, thrashing at the hard drive (reads and writes could be
smoothed a bit via caching), and CPU activity for decode
(which could be moved to a block on the video card).

With your knowledge of how MythTV works, maybe you'll find
a bottleneck similar to the above.

Paul
pinnerite
2021-04-09 09:15:08 UTC
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Permalink
On Tue, 06 Apr 2021 23:13:04 -0400
Post by Paul
Post by pinnerite
On Sat, 3 Apr 2021 16:01:28 +0100
Post by Abandoned_Trolley
Why not stop worrying about "bandwidth" (whatever that means to you) and
check the actual connection speed, just like any normal phone or laptop
user would ?
Theres no mention of it anywhere in this thread
AT
If I disconnect the phone connection at the router, I still have wi-fi access between my devices.
Recording TV does not depend on the wi-fi. the signal comes from the TV aerial directly to both the TV and the HTPC.
Both my work computer and the TV only handle 2.4Ghz. The remaining items are enabled for that and 5Ghz including a TP-Link wi-fi extender.
Now there is no problem on the combined frontend / backend server presumably because wi-fi is not involved. Similarly, playback to the TV is fine because it is connected by an HDMI cable. Sadly to the remote frontend on my work-machine it is.
The extraordinary thing is that playback of HD via wi-fi to my work machine is fine,
Live TV is not. Logically I would expect them behave the same.
As Ian Lang often says "I blame the EU".
But you know your MythTV better than anyone here.
The software (not MythTV) for my tuner card, does it this way.
"Live TV"
1) Comes into tuner from OTA antenna.
2) Tuner packets are written to disk. Disk could be on a backend machine.
3) Streaming software reads from disk (delayed maybe a second or two).
4) MPEG2 video now needs to be decoded and sent to a screen, from (3)
This uses a bit of CPU (in the old days), or it uses
the Video SIP on your video card.
The "feature" that comes with this, is while you are watching LiveTV,
you can "commit" what has just been shown, and the file stored on
the hard drive is then kept for later.
The activity in that sequence, might involve two passes on
Wifi, thrashing at the hard drive (reads and writes could be
smoothed a bit via caching), and CPU activity for decode
(which could be moved to a block on the video card).
With your knowledge of how MythTV works, maybe you'll find
a bottleneck similar to the above.
Paul
That is a very useful explanation but most MythTV users will be connected much the same way, yet I have not come across simmilar complaints.

However!

This morning I had to reboot the router because our cellphones registered "No Wifi" ot no "Internet connection". This has been happening throughout the year. Not frequently but often enough. I am wondering whether the router (supplied by TalkTalk) is actually faulty.

-
Mint 20.04, kernel 5.4.0-42-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
Paul
2021-04-09 17:55:35 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
This morning I had to reboot the router because our cellphones
registered "No Wifi" ot no "Internet connection". This has been
happening throughout the year. Not frequently but often enough.
I am wondering whether the router (supplied by TalkTalk) is actually faulty.
It's possible. My very first router was flake-city and
the most likely culprit was how the CPU was clocked.
Rather than the firmware being buggy. Embedded CPUs can
use a quartz crystal and an internal oscillator, or can
be driven from an external four pin tin can oscillator.
The tin can only has one job to do, and is thus more
trustworthy.

Sometimes, an excuse could be made for failures, based on
what the box-at-the-corner is doing.

All the other network boxes with a CPU inside since then,
have had the normal level of reliability. I don't consider
bad CPU design to be endemic. As the industry matures, things
should improve.

Another possibility is bad thermal design. As a recent example,
TPLink makes a new pair of 10GbE switches. One with five ports,
one with eight ports. The eight port one has a fan, the
five port one, does not have a fan. Hmmm. And the units
are expensive enough at retail, for a fan to be included
if it is needed. There was a time when GbE ports first
came out, where there were premature failures related
to thermals. One guy dremeled a hole in his and fitted
a regular heatsink to the main chip.

You can spot lots of really stupid stuff, when it
comes to engineering. I especially like disk enclosures
equipped with a fan, where there are no vent holes for
an air intake. And it works just as well as you would
expect :-)

Paul
Bit Twister
2021-04-10 00:21:16 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
This morning I had to reboot the router because our cellphones registered "No Wifi" ot no "Internet connection". This has been happening throughout the year. Not frequently but often enough. I am wondering whether the router (supplied by TalkTalk) is actually faulty.
I have seen the same kind of problem when my ISP upgrades the router firmware. I have also lost connection when my ISP re-balances the LAN and I get a new ip address but need to re-boot to get new ip.

I have an hourly cron job to check internet access and will tell me if my Internet ip address has changed.
Big Bad Bob
2021-04-14 09:51:59 UTC
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Post by pinnerite
Both my work computer and the TV only handle 2.4Ghz. The remaining items are enabled for that and 5Ghz including a TP-Link wi-fi extender.
2.4Ghz in the USA has bands that are too narrow for anything above
6Mbit; that is, they will extend beyond a single channel into the
neighboring channels.

You might want to use a scanning program to see what other access points
(and bluetooth devices) are also using bandwidth in the 2.4Ghz range.
Even some portable phones use it. It's _VERY_ noisy!!

(if you are using bluetooth headphones to listen to the audio, maybe
it's "that")

Airplane radars even interfere with 2.4Ghz. Are you near an airport?

The only thing you can do about 2.4Ghz interference is "big buffers" and
cross your fingers. Otherwise, ethernet.

On a side note, if your neighbors have frequency hopping APs, you could
"claim" a channel and use iperf to max out bandwidth on several
computers for a period of 1-2 hours until they move. It's a little mean
but so what.

From my house I can see at least 6 (and sometimes as many as 10) access
points on 2.4Ghz. Careful choice of channels, directional antennas, and
careful placement of the AP all help. THAT and the occasional "iperf
test" to drive others off of your claimed channels...
Post by pinnerite
The extraordinary thing is that playback of HD via wi-fi to my work machine is fine,
Live TV is not. Logically I would expect them behave the same.
playback that is NOT live TV may involve larger buffers... [I am not
familiar enough with Myth TV to know for sure]

over a decade ago I was involved in doing research on improving the
quality of streaming HD video over wifi. So I have a pretty good grip
on the things you have to deal with when it comes to RF interference,
especially on the 2.4Ghz band.
--
(aka 'Bombastic Bob' in case you wondered)

'Feeling with my fingers, and thinking with my brain' - me

'your story is so touching, but it sounds just like a lie'
"Straighten up and fly right"
Bud Frede
2021-04-23 22:03:45 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Big Bad Bob
Airplane radars even interfere with 2.4Ghz. Are you near an airport?
What?
Post by Big Bad Bob
The only thing you can do about 2.4Ghz interference is "big buffers"
and cross your fingers. Otherwise, ethernet.
Big buffers? What?
Post by Big Bad Bob
On a side note, if your neighbors have frequency hopping APs, you
could "claim" a channel and use iperf to max out bandwidth on several
computers for a period of 1-2 hours until they move. It's a little
mean but so what.
From my house I can see at least 6 (and sometimes as many as 10)
access points on 2.4Ghz. Careful choice of channels, directional
antennas, and careful placement of the AP all help. THAT and the
occasional "iperf test" to drive others off of your claimed
channels...
You're a real piece of work. I bet your neighbors regularly raise a
finger in your direction.
Post by Big Bad Bob
over a decade ago I was involved in doing research on improving the
quality of streaming HD video over wifi. So I have a pretty good grip
on the things you have to deal with when it comes to RF interference,
especially on the 2.4Ghz band.
Yeah, sure you were. A big "scientist" no doubt.
Big Bad Bob
2021-04-26 12:14:51 UTC
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Post by Bud Frede
Post by Big Bad Bob
Airplane radars even interfere with 2.4Ghz. Are you near an airport?
What?
Post by Big Bad Bob
The only thing you can do about 2.4Ghz interference is "big buffers"
and cross your fingers. Otherwise, ethernet.
Big buffers? What?
Shh... the adults [those with real engeering experience] are talking

Then again... hey look - HE DOESN'T UNDERSTAND!!! Would you like me to
draw the lines from A to B to C so that your puny mind can comprehend???

Did you even read the original post about watching video over wifi?
Post by Bud Frede
Post by Big Bad Bob
over a decade ago I was involved in doing research on improving the
quality of streaming HD video over wifi. So I have a pretty good grip
on the things you have to deal with when it comes to RF interference,
especially on the 2.4Ghz band.
Yeah, sure you were. A big "scientist" no doubt.
Troll off, bug. Or creep off. whatever.

My name is actually on a provisional patent from around 2008 regarding
this very thing, a method by which wifi packet reliability for UDP can
be improved for transmitting video. You can research the patent. Or
not. Up to you.

I bet you went to one of those "schools" where they didn't want to hurt
your self esteem so they went ahead and let you SPOUT PURE BULLSHIT and
then patted you on the back for "participating".

Johnny just said one and one is three. We can't hurt his FEELINGS and
tell him he's wrong. It's ok Johnny, just believe it's three, and
you're a good boy and shouldn't ever get discouraged...

Something like THAT, right?
--
(aka 'Bombastic Bob' in case you wondered)

'Feeling with my fingers, and thinking with my brain' - me

'your story is so touching, but it sounds just like a lie'
"Straighten up and fly right"
Bobbie Sellers
2021-04-28 05:55:28 UTC
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Permalink
Reader and typers,

I give you a great example of how a troll posts, There, there BBB you
don't need to do this to be given attention! I am sure you have some
good points that need development and support.

Oh but my good points rotted away and were spoiled in the long years...

bliss-“Nearly any fool can use a GNU/Linux computer. Many do.” After all
here I am...
Post by Bud Frede
Airplane radars even interfere with 2.4Ghz.  Are you near an airport?
What?
The only thing you can do about 2.4Ghz interference is "big buffers"
and cross your fingers.  Otherwise, ethernet.
Big buffers? What?
Shh...  the adults [those with real engeering experience] are talking
Then again... hey look - HE DOESN'T UNDERSTAND!!!  Would you like me to
draw the lines from A to B to C so that your puny mind can comprehend???
Did you even read the original post about watching video over wifi?
Post by Bud Frede
over a decade ago I was involved in doing research on improving the
quality of streaming HD video over wifi.  So I have a pretty good grip
on the things you have to deal with when it comes to RF interference,
especially on the 2.4Ghz band.
Yeah, sure you were. A big "scientist" no doubt.
Troll off, bug.  Or creep off. whatever.
My name is actually on a provisional patent from around 2008 regarding
this very thing, a method by which wifi packet reliability for UDP can
be improved for transmitting video.  You can research the patent.  Or
not.  Up to you.
I bet you went to one of those "schools" where they didn't want to hurt
your self esteem so they went ahead and let you SPOUT PURE BULLSHIT and
then patted you on the back for "participating".
Johnny just said one and one is three.  We can't hurt his FEELINGS and
tell him he's wrong.  It's ok Johnny, just believe it's three, and
you're a good boy and shouldn't ever get discouraged...
Something like THAT, right?
gcubebuddy
2021-04-20 02:58:52 UTC
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Permalink
pi> is there /are there any programs that can demonstrate the wi-fi bandwith
pi> and perhaps how it is bewing sliced up?

Hello, you can try the cli command iptraf it will show packets moving through
your computer. wireshark can also do simular stuff with a fancy graphics
front end.
thanks
- Luke

Thanks
- Gamecube Buddy

telnet --<{bbs.hive32.com:23333}>--
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