Discussion:
Post installation
(too old to reply)
pinnerite
2020-09-23 12:44:34 UTC
Permalink
I have just installed kubuntu 20.4 on a spare drive.
when booting on it, it gets as far as:

"Set console scheme"

And then stalls.

Whats the best recommendation for the next step?

TIA
--
Mint 20.0, kernel 5.4.0-45-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
Mike Easter
2020-09-23 13:06:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by pinnerite
I have just installed kubuntu 20.4 on a spare drive.
"Set console scheme"
And then stalls.
Whats the best recommendation for the next step?
I'm reading that it has to do w/

setvtrgb.service

by systemctl.

... but, in any case, it is a boot algo failure.

The letters vt are for virtual terminal & rgb the colors.

What happened when you booted the live Kub 20.04?
--
Mike Easter
pinnerite
2020-09-23 13:35:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
Post by pinnerite
I have just installed kubuntu 20.4 on a spare drive.
"Set console scheme"
And then stalls.
Whats the best recommendation for the next step?
I'm reading that it has to do w/
setvtrgb.service
by systemctl.
... but, in any case, it is a boot algo failure.
The letters vt are for virtual terminal & rgb the colors.
What happened when you booted the live Kub 20.04?
It came up and I went straiht to install.
--
Mint 20.0, kernel 5.4.0-45-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
Mike Easter
2020-09-23 16:54:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by pinnerite
Post by Mike Easter
Post by pinnerite
I have just installed kubuntu 20.4 on a spare drive.
"Set console scheme"
And then stalls.
Whats the best recommendation for the next step?
I'm reading that it has to do w/
setvtrgb.service
by systemctl.
... but, in any case, it is a boot algo failure.
The letters vt are for virtual terminal & rgb the colors.
What happened when you booted the live Kub 20.04?
It came up and I went straiht to install.
I don't have a Kub 20.04 handy, but I booted a live current Neon.

If you boot your live Kub 20.04, you can see what is the condition of
the file /etc/vtrgb compared to what is in your install etc/vtrgb

I don't know if your problem is the content or the process.
--
Mike Easter
Mike Easter
2020-09-23 17:21:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
I don't have a Kub 20.04 handy, but I booted a live current Neon.
If you boot your live Kub 20.04, you can see what is the condition of
the file /etc/vtrgb compared to what is in your install etc/vtrgb
I don't know if your problem is the content or the process.
On my live Neon, I looked at:

sudo cat /var/log/boot.log

and

sudo journalctl

and

sudo cat /var/log/messages

But I couldn't find anything useful on mine. You might boot the live,
mount the install part so you can use your terminal in there, and look
to see if there is anything useful about vtrgb in that stuff.
--
Mike Easter
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-23 19:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
Post by Mike Easter
I don't have a Kub 20.04 handy, but I booted a live current Neon.
If you boot your live Kub 20.04, you can see what is the condition of
the file /etc/vtrgb compared to what is in your install etc/vtrgb
I don't know if your problem is the content or the process.
sudo cat /var/log/boot.log
and
sudo journalctl
and
sudo cat /var/log/messages
But I couldn't find anything useful on mine.  You might boot the live,
mount the install part so you can use your terminal in there, and look
to see if there is anything useful about vtrgb in that stuff.
Just a small nitpick, you don't need elevated privileges to view logs.
Also I haven't seen /var/log/messages on a Ubuntu system in some time
(maybe ever, last time I recall was on Mandrake and RH)
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Mike Easter
2020-09-23 20:00:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Mike Easter
sudo cat /var/log/boot.log
Just a small nitpick, you don't need elevated privileges to view logs.
Also I haven't seen /var/log/messages on a Ubuntu system in some time
(maybe ever, last time I recall was on Mandrake and RH)
I got a permission denied on the cat /var/log/boot.log, so I just used
sudo on the rest, which didn't need it.

ls -l /var/log/boot.log said -rw-------
--
Mike Easter
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-23 21:30:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Mike Easter
sudo cat /var/log/boot.log
Just a small nitpick, you don't need elevated privileges to view logs.
Also I haven't seen /var/log/messages on a Ubuntu system in some time
(maybe ever, last time I recall was on Mandrake and RH)
I got a permission denied on the cat /var/log/boot.log, so I just used
sudo on the rest, which didn't need it.
ls -l /var/log/boot.log said -rw-------
Seems peculiar to you. If system has a boot.log which I think are legacy
systems with have bee upgraded from older versions of Ubuntu

ls -l /var/log/boot.log
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 8136 Sep 22 17:45 /var/log/boot.log

whereas fresh installs of 16.04 and up have no boot.log
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Dirk T. Verbeek
2020-09-23 17:08:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by pinnerite
Post by Mike Easter
Post by pinnerite
I have just installed kubuntu 20.4 on a spare drive.
"Set console scheme"
And then stalls.
Whats the best recommendation for the next step?
I'm reading that it has to do w/
setvtrgb.service
by systemctl.
... but, in any case, it is a boot algo failure.
The letters vt are for virtual terminal & rgb the colors.
What happened when you booted the live Kub 20.04?
It came up and I went straiht to install.
I would suggest to do a new install, after all it only takes minutes.

But this time start by going into the full desktop from the live USB
drive and only then select installation.
pinnerite
2020-09-24 13:13:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dirk T. Verbeek
Post by pinnerite
Post by Mike Easter
Post by pinnerite
I have just installed kubuntu 20.4 on a spare drive.
"Set console scheme"
And then stalls.
Whats the best recommendation for the next step?
I'm reading that it has to do w/
setvtrgb.service
by systemctl.
... but, in any case, it is a boot algo failure.
The letters vt are for virtual terminal & rgb the colors.
What happened when you booted the live Kub 20.04?
It came up and I went straiht to install.
I would suggest to do a new install, after all it only takes minutes.
But this time start by going into the full desktop from the live USB
drive and only then select installation.
When I wrote it came up, I meant from the full desktop.

This morning I booted again and it went a couple of items after "set
console scheme".

From there I could get a terminal using CTRL-ALT-F2 (F1 had not worked
(?))

I ran:

1) apt-get install -f Nothing changed.
2) apt-get update, followed by apt-get upgrade.
Lots of activity but $ startx did nothing

# startx did produce a wallpaper on both screens, one heavily messed up
but no panel and no desktop icons.

I could not get any further.

I may try a reinstall later.












I created a root password.
--
Mint 20.0, kernel 5.4.0-45-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-24 14:30:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by pinnerite
Post by Dirk T. Verbeek
Post by pinnerite
Post by Mike Easter
Post by pinnerite
I have just installed kubuntu 20.4 on a spare drive.
"Set console scheme"
And then stalls.
Whats the best recommendation for the next step?
I'm reading that it has to do w/
setvtrgb.service
by systemctl.
... but, in any case, it is a boot algo failure.
The letters vt are for virtual terminal & rgb the colors.
What happened when you booted the live Kub 20.04?
It came up and I went straiht to install.
I would suggest to do a new install, after all it only takes minutes.
But this time start by going into the full desktop from the live USB
drive and only then select installation.
When I wrote it came up, I meant from the full desktop.
This morning I booted again and it went a couple of items after "set
console scheme".
From there I could get a terminal using CTRL-ALT-F2 (F1 had not worked
(?))
Okay thing to note here is the GUI session used to be on TTY7 but not it
has been switched to TTY1 (because? why not!), so if your DE is broken
then CTRL-ALT-F1 will not work.
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
pinnerite
2020-09-24 15:04:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by pinnerite
Post by Dirk T. Verbeek
I would suggest to do a new install, after all it only takes minutes.
But this time start by going into the full desktop from the live USB
drive and only then select installation.
When I wrote it came up, I meant from the full desktop.
This morning I booted again and it went a couple of items after "set
console scheme".
From there I could get a terminal using CTRL-ALT-F2 (F1 had not worked
(?))
Okay thing to note here is the GUI session used to be on TTY7 but not it
has been switched to TTY1 (because? why not!), so if your DE is broken
then CTRL-ALT-F1 will not work.
Well, booted on the install DVD.
When it came up I changed the dsplay settings (worked perfectly), and the
LAN settings - static address.
This time I noticed a message saying the installer had crashed (always a
comfort).

I then reinstalled.
Updated and upgraded as before and rebooted.

It performed exactly as previously.
I am downloading 20.04.1 now and will go through the process of checking
the checksum before burning the DVD (I forgot that last time) and
installing again. Watch this space.
--
Mint 20.0, kernel 5.4.0-45-generic, Cinnamon 4.6.7
running on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition processor with 8GB of DRAM.
Bit Twister
2020-09-24 15:55:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by pinnerite
I am downloading 20.04.1 now and will go through the process of checking
the checksum before burning the DVD (I forgot that last time) and
installing again. Watch this space.
Heheheh, I downloaded ubuntu-20.04.1-desktop-amd64.iso, tried installing
in a VirutalBox guest and it spent hours installing libreofice-help* files.
I had set Chicago time zone and it was unpacking German, and numerous
Asian help files before I aborted it.
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-24 16:30:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by pinnerite
It performed exactly as previously.
I am downloading 20.04.1 now and will go through the process of checking
the checksum before burning the DVD (I forgot that last time) and
installing again. Watch this space.
I haven't bothered burning DVD in some time, just use a thumb drive.
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Mike Easter
2020-09-24 18:46:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by pinnerite
I am downloading 20.04.1 now
As a datapoint that might not be useful, I dl/ed 20.04.1, checked the
hash, wrote it to USB and booted the live.

Everything is fine with it live (free -m 430). It does have a
/etc/vtrgb file but it doesn't have any of those logs I mentioned earlier.
--
Mike Easter
Mike Easter
2020-09-25 01:30:44 UTC
Permalink
I dl/ed 20.04.1, checked the hash, wrote it to USB and booted the live.
While I had Kub 20.04.1 up, I decided to look it over as well as
consider some recent reviews. I looked at 3 of those, 2 by reviewers I
hadn't read before and 1 by Igor L. (dedoimedo) of whom I've read many
reviews. Of the 3, I found Ordinatech the most interesting. Part of
his focus was in resolving his NVidia issue (nouveau vs nvidia) the most
easily, of which I had no interest ('tho I have one old '06 machine w/ a
nvidia G84 card), but he gave the current Kub kudos for that.

His focus on that aspect was so extensive that he wrote a separate blog
article called 'The Best Distributions for Problematic Nvidia Optimus
Hybrid Graphics' -- of which the short version is that he liked Arch's
optimus-manager from the AUR and Kub's nvidia-prime from its standard
repo/s.

Of more interest to me was comparing his experience w/ other KDEs and
our shared negative opinion about where Ubuntu appears to be going w/
its Snap insistence. He cited an excellent example to prove his point
in a KSnip installation. We may also recall some opinions from Mint's
decision not to go that way.

KSnip is an example of a package which was previously available as a
.ppa for recent Ub releases (not Fossa), but now is available as a Snap
instead, no .ppa, which snap is not as properly integrated w/ the
desktop as a Qt based app should be in Plasma. The ksnip regression
from the influence of snap transition from .ppa is just one more example
of the disadvantage of the adverse effect of Canonical going snap.
(But) You could say that snap relieves some development pressure on
those who would provide .ppa/s instead.

He also discusses some of his ideas about how to resolve the 'conflict'
that occurs between gtk apps and a qt desktop. Plasma has a strategy,
and the implementation varies.

Besides his extensive review, he also has branched articles such as
Kubuntu 20.04 LTS Review Supplement: Fixes and Enhancements in which he
develops the issue described above about nvidia-prime as well as his
technique for mod/ing the Kub default theme so as to more resemble
Unity, which he liked.

Kub's default package managers are Discover (software center) and Muon
(like synaptic using qapt, a qt gdebi). I read a separate article about
the development of Muon off qapt; I hadn't realized that package
management of Debian-type packages in KDE had concerns or issues due to
Gnome-GTK vs Qt.

He develops a discussion about which apps a distro chooses to default,
in which 'leaning' toward a Qt app vs a gtk one might not always be the
best choice. We often see this argument developed by those who favor
gtk-based apps who have concerns when someone decides they want a
qt-kde-based app instead, so the dependencies are considered baggage.
How well the integration w/ the desktop works is variable.

Another angle the Ordinatech reviewer decided to develop was his
personal opinion that we should be verifying our downloads not just w/ a
hash, but also w/ a signature, which I would say I never bother to do.
I suppose one could have a topic of debate about that. It comes up in
the review because the Kub dl and hash access don't also give direct
access to such a sigm so he created another branch article to talk about
that process.

https://www.ordinatechnic.com/distribution-reviews/Kubuntu/kubuntu-2004-lts-review
Kubuntu 20.04 LTS Review
--
Mike Easter
Mike Easter
2020-09-27 17:40:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
Another angle the Ordinatech reviewer decided to develop was his
personal opinion that we should be verifying our downloads not just w/ a
hash, but also w/ a signature, which I would say I never bother to do.
For an exercise, I decided to 'follow the breadcrumbs' that ordinatech
laid out about his nit about the sig verification.

I recently dl/ed the Ub Mate 20.04.1. Sure enough, the sig wasn't
anywhere near the torrent and the hash. It isn't far from the direct
download tho'.

https://ubuntu-mate.org/download/amd64/focal/

However, in fairness to the distro, there are direct links to pages that
explain in sufficient detail how to verify checksums and on a separate
page sigs in multiple platforms.

The sig instruction page
https://ubuntu-mate.org/faq/verify-download-secure/

However; my 'job' wasn't over because I typically dl linux distro/s on a
Win7 machine and use Win tools such as HashCalc, Rufus, & Yumi. The
instructions provided above rec a Win10 machine w/ WSL. Get real.

In order to use my Win7 machine to verify as well, it was necessary to
install gpg4win along w/ its parts; I included Kleopatra, GPA, & gpgEX.

In addition to installing gpg4win, it is also necessary to configure
such as Kleo to be able to acquire the Ubuntu public key/s by adding the
ubuntu keyserver to the default keyserver of Kleo.

It is also necessary to 'defeat' the mechanisms purposed to provide a
download of the .iso or a dl of the torrent so as to access the dl
directory for the .iso (instead of using the link which only accesses
the .iso, not its directory) and then dl both the hash file and its
accompanying .gpg sig into a same directory.

It is quite understandable why I never bothered to verify other than the
hash vs the .iso, not the hash vs its sig. It is significant extra
steps. I'm doubtful that I am going to make that verification part of
my routine dl/ing procedure. Rather I am going to trust that I can tell
what I'm doing when I dl an .iso to boot.

So, the bottom line down here is that I disagree w/ ordinatech (and some
others) who say that we should be verifying our hashes with their sigs.
--
Mike Easter
Mike Easter
2020-09-27 18:44:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
In order to use my Win7 machine to verify as well, it was necessary to
install gpg4win along w/ its parts; I included Kleopatra, GPA, & gpgEX.
There is a thread* in the Mint forums: "How to verify the ISO image on
Windows". Surprisingly, it goes on for 8 pages 154 msg/s for the past
18 mos from '19 Mar to '20 Sep.

The initial entry was edited 22 times between '19 Mar & '20 Jan, and the
result is very good, but it isn't the way I do it.

He uses all commands for windows using certutil (natively present) for
the hash and gpg (needs install) for the sig. That is quite a lot of
keystrokes for win, as it doesn't have great console tools such as
auto-complete.

I save the .iso using qbittorrent, check the hash w/ hashcalc and if I
were to verify the hash I would need to do quite a lot more graphical
steps to employ gpg4win, but ultimately I would verify the hash
graphically w/ gpg4win's kleopatra.


https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=291093
--
Mike Easter
Bobbie Sellers
2020-09-27 21:09:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
In order to use my Win7 machine to verify as well, it was necessary to
install gpg4win along w/ its parts; I included Kleopatra, GPA, & gpgEX.
There is a thread* in the Mint forums:  "How to verify the ISO image on
Windows".  Surprisingly, it goes on for 8 pages 154 msg/s for the past
18 mos from '19 Mar to '20 Sep.
The initial entry was edited 22 times between '19 Mar & '20 Jan, and the
result is very good, but it isn't the way I do it.
He uses all commands for windows using certutil (natively present) for
the hash and gpg (needs install) for the sig.  That is quite a lot of
keystrokes for win, as it doesn't have great console tools such as
auto-complete.
I save the .iso using qbittorrent, check the hash w/ hashcalc and if I
were to verify the hash I would need to do quite a lot more graphical
steps to employ gpg4win, but ultimately I would verify the hash
graphically w/ gpg4win's kleopatra.
https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=291093
I use Linux exclusively to download and do checksums on all
downloads which I do in my capacity as LUG librarian. The signatures
are another layer of complexity which the publishers of my distro
do not bother with, although if I was in a better state I might
try to puzzle out the procedure.

I sympathize but not with the use of Windows 7 to download.

On my personal downloads which are mostly .zip or .mkv even
if checksums are provided I usually ignore and read or play the
the downloads.
But nothing that I am passing onto other Linux users gets
by me with out being check-summed.

bliss
--
bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
Mike Easter
2020-09-27 22:24:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobbie Sellers
I use Linux exclusively to download and do checksums on all
downloads which I do in my  capacity as LUG librarian.
All of this is much easier to do in linux. It wouldn't actually be very
hard for me to 're-rig' how my hardware is setup so that instead of
Win7, I would do it all in linux; dl the .iso by torrent, check the
hash, and write the .iso to USB. However, Rufus has won my heart in
terms of the best tool to write an .iso to USB. But it can't do
multiboot and it can't do persistence for any but Ub related .iso/s, but
I typically do all that w/ other Win tools such as Yumi.

And, if I were inclined to start w/ checking the hash sig, that would
also be pretty easy to do in linux, altho' I'm mostly inclined to
continue skipping that.

But, I do prefer doing all these things graphically over the command
line, whether linux or Win. And working the command line in Win is a
pita since it can't auto-complete.
Post by Bobbie Sellers
The signatures are another layer of complexity which the publishers
of my distro do not bother with, although if I was in a better state
I might try to puzzle out the procedure.
So far, it looks like the instructions at the Mint site (for linux) are
the best looking to me
Post by Bobbie Sellers
    I sympathize but not with the use of Windows 7 to download.
It all started because of the 'nature' of the hdd storage on a machine
that was 'primarily' Win7 and secondarily a test bed for live linux
distro/s. Then the situation was enhanced by my ongoing attraction to
Rufus and its continuing development, and even more so when I got
involved w/ an email support interaction w/ the Rufus dev Pete Batard.

And I'm not 'averse' to using Win for something even tho' I prefer to do
my everyday driving in linux. That Win7 machine is always immediately
accessible to me because I can 'flip' into it from my linux operations.
Two desktop machines, one monitor, one keyboard, one mouse, so that is
how I handle the linux .iso business.
Post by Bobbie Sellers
    On my personal downloads which are mostly .zip or .mkv even
if checksums are provided I usually ignore and read or play the
the downloads.
I always do the checksums (unless not available) but 'never' do the
checksum sig. I'll probably resume that style now that I've developed a
system for easily doing the checksum sig in Win because I consider that
verification to be unnecessary.
Post by Bobbie Sellers
    But nothing that I am passing onto other Linux users gets
by me with out being check-summed.
--
Mike Easter
Mike Easter
2020-09-28 00:58:06 UTC
Permalink
It wouldn't actually be very hard for me to 're-rig' how my hardware is
setup so that instead of Win7, I would do it all in linux; dl the .iso
by torrent, check the hash, and write the .iso to USB.  However, Rufus
has won my heart in terms of the best tool to write an .iso to USB.  But
it can't do multiboot and it can't do persistence for any but Ub related
.iso/s, but I typically do all that w/ other Win tools such as Yumi.
And, if I were inclined to start w/ checking the hash sig, that would
also be pretty easy to do in linux, altho' I'm mostly inclined to
continue skipping that.
But, I do prefer doing all these things graphically over the command
line, whether linux or Win.
If I were going to do the above in linux, it could all be done
graphically using a torrent app w/ such as qbittorrent or transmission,
gtkhash for the checksum, etcher for single .iso or I could evaluate
ventoy for multibooting .iso/s.

If I wanted to verify checksum sigs graphically, I think I could use
seahorse via the appropriate plug-in for a file manager such as caja,
nautilus, or nemo all of which are in my current repo/s.

I believe I'll setup a live linux w/ persistence to boot on the
'primarily Win7' machine and configure it to have the above graphical
tools to torrent, checksum, checksum sig, and USB write to see if it is
all as easy as it sounds. The ventoy would be on a separate USB.

However, Win's Yumi is capable of having each of its multiboot have
persistence, but I never do that. Whenever I make something w/
persistence, it is all by itself. Usually I do that in linux on an Ub
type distro and use mkusb.
--
Mike Easter
Paul
2020-09-28 04:09:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Easter
Post by Bobbie Sellers
I use Linux exclusively to download and do checksums on all
downloads which I do in my capacity as LUG librarian.
All of this is much easier to do in linux. It wouldn't actually be very
hard for me to 're-rig' how my hardware is setup so that instead of
Win7, I would do it all in linux; dl the .iso by torrent, check the
hash, and write the .iso to USB. However, Rufus has won my heart in
terms of the best tool to write an .iso to USB. But it can't do
multiboot and it can't do persistence for any but Ub related .iso/s, but
I typically do all that w/ other Win tools such as Yumi.
And, if I were inclined to start w/ checking the hash sig, that would
also be pretty easy to do in linux, altho' I'm mostly inclined to
continue skipping that.
But, I do prefer doing all these things graphically over the command
line, whether linux or Win. And working the command line in Win is a
pita since it can't auto-complete.
Post by Bobbie Sellers
The signatures are another layer of complexity which the publishers
of my distro do not bother with, although if I was in a better state
I might try to puzzle out the procedure.
So far, it looks like the instructions at the Mint site (for linux) are
the best looking to me
Post by Bobbie Sellers
I sympathize but not with the use of Windows 7 to download.
It all started because of the 'nature' of the hdd storage on a machine
that was 'primarily' Win7 and secondarily a test bed for live linux
distro/s. Then the situation was enhanced by my ongoing attraction to
Rufus and its continuing development, and even more so when I got
involved w/ an email support interaction w/ the Rufus dev Pete Batard.
And I'm not 'averse' to using Win for something even tho' I prefer to do
my everyday driving in linux. That Win7 machine is always immediately
accessible to me because I can 'flip' into it from my linux operations.
Two desktop machines, one monitor, one keyboard, one mouse, so that is
how I handle the linux .iso business.
Post by Bobbie Sellers
On my personal downloads which are mostly .zip or .mkv even
if checksums are provided I usually ignore and read or play the
the downloads.
I always do the checksums (unless not available) but 'never' do the
checksum sig. I'll probably resume that style now that I've developed a
system for easily doing the checksum sig in Win because I consider that
verification to be unnecessary.
Post by Bobbie Sellers
But nothing that I am passing onto other Linux users gets
by me with out being check-summed.
Here's a picture of what Windows can do today.

Picture contents:

1) Tab-completion in Powershell.
2) Shellex checksums thanks to 7ZIP

Loading Image...

Anything more than that, Arlen will do it for us :-)

I'm not really crazy about Powershell, and at times,
wish it would go away. People code stuff for Win10 PS
that won't run on Win7 or whatever. I wasted valuable
time yesterday on one of these goose chases (a Microsoft
tutorial article that didn't work as claimed). Whereas
the ancient Command Prompt usually behaves itself.
Powershell is kinda like Python, in terms of bad
table manners ("which version ya runnin?").

Paul
Bobbie Sellers
2020-09-28 14:50:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Post by Bobbie Sellers
I use Linux exclusively to download and do checksums on all
downloads which I do in my  capacity as LUG librarian.
snip of Linux discussion
Post by Paul
Post by Bobbie Sellers
     But nothing that I am passing onto other Linux users gets
by me with out being check-summed.
Beginning of off topic discussion of Windows.
I have Windows installed on one machine, because the
SSD I installed required it apparently to work properly
It is very limited in size and I never boot it.
I don't like Windows for historical reasons.
I know what it can do but it does not make me like
it any better nor do I care for its business models
past and present. I find the interface gets in my
way but when I have to I can go quickly into Windows
reducing the size of the Page Mode files and reducing
the Windows partition sizes to make room to install
some variety of GNU/Linux.
You are better off running Linux unless
you are totally ignorant of computer operations.

And I will never bother with Windows for
longer than those two operations require unless
some foolish organization pays me an awful lot
per hour.

bliss
Post by Paul
Here's a picture of what Windows can do today.
1) Tab-completion in Powershell.
2) Shellex checksums thanks to 7ZIP
https://i.postimg.cc/W35m9xL8/some-pet-tricks.gif
Anything more than that, Arlen will do it for us :-)
I'm not really crazy about Powershell, and at times,
wish it would go away. People code stuff for Win10 PS
that won't run on Win7 or whatever. I wasted valuable
time yesterday on one of these goose chases (a Microsoft
tutorial article that didn't work as claimed). Whereas
the ancient Command Prompt usually behaves itself.
Powershell is kinda like Python, in terms of bad
table manners ("which version ya runnin?").
   Paul
--
bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-28 16:59:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobbie Sellers
I have Windows installed on one machine, because the
SSD I installed required it apparently to work properly
Sorry Bobbie, I have to stop you there. There is no SSD that I know of
that requires Windows or is Windows only, there must be some other
issue. What is the SSD?

I have only one Windows system left, and only because of Corel and
CorelDraw only really runs on Windows now. Only semi-legit reason in my
option to run Windows. When I build my next machine if I can swing the
$$ I will go to Windows on VM for CorelDraw.
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Bobbie Sellers
2020-09-28 18:49:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Bobbie Sellers
I have Windows installed on one machine, because the
SSD I installed required it apparently to work properly
Sorry Bobbie, I have to stop you there. There is no SSD that I know of
that requires Windows or is Windows only, there must be some other
issue. What is the SSD?
I think I mispoke as it seems a requirement of the very nice
Dell E7450 rather than the SSD. But until the Windows Install I
could not get it to boot into Linux from the SSD.
Post by Jonathan N. Little
I have only one Windows system left, and only because of Corel and
CorelDraw only really runs on Windows now. Only semi-legit reason in my
option to run Windows. When I build my next machine if I can swing the
$$ I will go to Windows on VM for CorelDraw.
Oh there are doubtless many good reasons to run Windows if one is
being paid or otherwise making money doing so. But I don't want
to read advocacy or advertisements for Windows in Linux newsgroups.
As I mentioned I have historical reasons to avoid Windows imperialism.


bliss
--
bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
Paul
2020-09-28 19:55:03 UTC
Permalink
But I don't want to read advocacy or advertisements
I aim for balance in USENET info.

If someone shaves a claim unnecessarily, then
I feel it fair to inform them. That's not advocacy,
that's knowledge.

*******

Notice that I did not proselytize by telling you
about the Powershell port for Linux and insisting
you try it. You see, that steps outside the envelope
of what's acceptable. There is no reasonable reason
for you to know or care about that. You would not
have a use for it. So I did not include it.

Windows 10 is a productivity destroyer. But so is
any computer that insists on doing upgrades in your
face and blocking your activities on a desktop. I
judge them all by the same metric.

Notice that they all copy from one another and
"trend" in the same directions. The latest thing
is sandboxing and shoving everything in containers,
just to make things slower to launch and so on. Just say No
to Snap. (If there's a problem, there is *no way*
to debug what's going on inside the Snap container.
That's important to me.)

Well, Windows 10 is going that way too,
*everything* will be on Hyper-V, as long as the
hardware supports it. As users we have to provide
feedback to these people, to make them stop...

It's so bad now, that computers are being rated
by their "ability to display Facebook pages",
where Facebook rendering is some kind of
heat stroke inducing activity :-/ What a sad
fucked up world we live in.

Paul
Bobbie Sellers
2020-09-28 21:27:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
But I don't want to read advocacy or advertisements
I aim for balance in USENET info.
If someone shaves a claim unnecessarily, then
I feel it fair to inform them. That's not advocacy,
that's knowledge.
*******
Notice that I did not proselytize by telling you
about the Powershell port for Linux and insisting
you try it. You see, that steps outside the envelope
of what's acceptable. There is no reasonable reason
for you to know or care about that. You would not
have a use for it. So I did not include it.
Windows 10 is a productivity destroyer. But so is
any computer that insists on doing upgrades in your
face and blocking your activities on a desktop. I
judge them all by the same metric.
Notice that they all copy from one another and
"trend" in the same directions. The latest thing
is sandboxing and shoving everything in containers,
just to make things slower to launch and so on. Just say No
to Snap. (If there's a problem, there is *no way*
to debug what's going on inside the Snap container.
That's important to me.)
Well, Windows 10 is going that way too,
*everything* will be on Hyper-V, as long as the
hardware supports it. As users we have to provide
feedback to these people, to make them stop...
It's so bad now, that computers are being rated
by their "ability to display Facebook pages",
where Facebook rendering is some kind of
heat stroke inducing activity :-/ What a sad
fucked up world we live in.
Well I abominate Facebook but it is something
many people use so whether or not the computer can
handle the site is important to them.
Post by Paul
Paul
They are selling these low specification devices
because they know there is a large market presently with
the schools closed and distance learning the main problem
to be solved.

I have owned new computers a C=64 quite a while
back, a Compaq (Hp built) and an HP Pavilion notebook.
Both lasted about 4 to 4.5 years. So I use Used computers
and try to buy high specced devices in good condition.
Presently I have 3 Dells two office notebooks and one
laptop. I don't know if they will handle Facebook
because as I mention above I abominate it. Facebook
recently closed the accounts on several good causes
from my pov of course and this just confirmed my
dislike of the F'book.

bliss
--
bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-28 21:46:16 UTC
Permalink
    I have owned new computers a C=64 quite a while
back, a Compaq (Hp built) and an HP Pavilion notebook.
Both lasted about 4 to 4.5 years.  So I use Used computers
and try to buy high specced devices in good condition.
Presently I have 3 Dells two office notebooks and one
laptop.  I don't know if they will handle Facebook
because as I mention above I abominate it. Facebook
recently closed the accounts on several good causes
from my pov of course and this just confirmed my
dislike of the F'book.
Facebook is so poorly coded bit frontend and backend it runs poorly on
any spec'ed system. They have so much scripting pushing content and
quadrupled amount monitoring your every action. Chokes any browser.
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-28 21:40:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Notice that they all copy from one another and
"trend" in the same directions. The latest thing
is sandboxing and shoving everything in containers,
just to make things slower to launch and so on. Just say No
to Snap. (If there's a problem, there is *no way*
to debug what's going on inside the Snap container.
That's important to me.)
The concept of snap did sound promising on first blush, but in practice
the snap'ed apps seem buggier and missing functionally than the direct
install versions.

Example: snap version of Inkscape would not let you save directly to
network storage. Uninstalled and install the regular install and saving
was no problem...
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Henry Crun
2020-09-29 04:51:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Paul
Notice that they all copy from one another and
"trend" in the same directions. The latest thing
is sandboxing and shoving everything in containers,
just to make things slower to launch and so on. Just say No
to Snap. (If there's a problem, there is *no way*
to debug what's going on inside the Snap container.
That's important to me.)
The concept of snap did sound promising on first blush, but in practice
the snap'ed apps seem buggier and missing functionally than the direct
install versions.
Example: snap version of Inkscape would not let you save directly to
network storage. Uninstalled and install the regular install and saving
was no problem...
My backups fitted (squashed) on a DVD until Snap started exploding the disk usage.
Removing all snap installed SW, snapd etc. saved the day as far as I'm concerned,
with (so far) no ill effects - Synaptic works just fine.
The upgrade from 18.04 to 20.04 has just arrived, so hopefully I will be able to
avoid snap after upgrading, even though Canonical seem to be keen to push it...
--
Mike R.
Home: http://alpha.mike-r.com/
QOTD: http://alpha.mike-r.com/qotd.php
No Micro$oft products were used in the URLs above, or in preparing this message.
Recommended reading: http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#before
and: http://alpha.mike-r.com/jargon/T/top-post.html
Missile address: N31.7624/E34.9691
Jonathan N. Little
2020-09-29 14:10:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Henry Crun
My backups fitted (squashed) on a DVD until Snap started exploding
the disk usage. Removing all snap installed SW, snapd etc. saved the
day as far as I'm concerned, with (so far) no ill effects - Synaptic
works just fine. The upgrade from 18.04 to 20.04 has just arrived, so
hopefully I will be able to avoid snap after upgrading, even though
Canonical seem to be keen to push it...
The problem is with latest releases of Ubuntu some packages are only as
snaps. The apt package is only a stub pointing to the snap. I guess
compiling from source will be a thing again.
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Henry Crun
2020-09-30 02:36:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Henry Crun
My backups fitted (squashed) on a DVD until Snap started exploding
the disk usage. Removing all snap installed SW, snapd etc. saved the
day as far as I'm concerned, with (so far) no ill effects - Synaptic
works just fine. The upgrade from 18.04 to 20.04 has just arrived, so
hopefully I will be able to avoid snap after upgrading, even though
Canonical seem to be keen to push it...
The problem is with latest releases of Ubuntu some packages are only as
snaps. The apt package is only a stub pointing to the snap. I guess
compiling from source will be a thing again.
After doing an upgrade (using Software updater) on a test PC (i.e. not my regular working desktop):

Did "snap list --all" and "snap remove ..."
Removed snap following:
https://cialu.net/how-to-disable-and-remove-completely-snaps-in-ubuntu-linux/


The only package that "insisted" on installing by snap was chromium
There is a workaround on:
https://askubuntu.com/questions/1204571/chromium-without-snap
if chromium is really important to you (not entirely supported, but probably easier than compiling from source.)

To sum it up: Admittedly only since yesterday, but no unfortunate incidents... so far.
Otherwise, I see Mint on the horizon.
--
Mike R.
Home: http://alpha.mike-r.com
QOTD: http://alpha.mike-r.com/qotd.php
No Micro$oft products were used in the URLs above, or in preparing this message.
Recommended reading: http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#before
and: http://alpha.mike-r.com/jargon/T/top-post.html
Missile address: N31.7624/E34.9691
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